Emotions dominate emotions. They gain the majority of psychological,

Emotions can be defined as consciously felt experiences characterised by valence and arousal, cognitive appraisal and action readiness (Elster, J. 1999). Emotions are seen as the causes, mediators, or effects of other psychological processes such as attention, memory, and perception (Barrett, L.F. 2006). They are traditionally expressed through humans physical characteristics including, face, body and voice.Valence and arousal are two of the key properties which dominate emotions. They gain the majority of psychological, subjective, and behavioural variation on people’s emotional reactions and are typically characterised as the core of any emotional experience (Barrett, 2006; Russell & Barrett, 1999). Valence considers the consumers experience of positive & negative emotions at similar times and these are evident throughout every stage of the consumer decision making process (Andrade, E.B. P.90, 2015). It is essentially a battle for one to become more dominant. For example, a consumer could feel a sense of guilt after purchasing an overly expensive product, but could experience satisfaction with the product itself. Arousal consider how people spontaneously assess the intensity of an emotion, regardless of whether it is positive or negative (Andrade, E.B. The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology, p. 95). Arousal affects people’s memory, attention, persuasion and evaluative judgements, while making valence more intenseCognitive appraisal theory suggests emotional experience reflect an individual’s cognitive appraisal of the environment (Andrade, E.B. The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology, p. 96)There are ten main types of emotions which humans experience: joy, anger, interest, disgust, surprise, sadness, fear, contempt, shame and guilt (Izard, C.E. 1992). The presence of emotions however does come with its consequences to both humans and businesses. The majority of everyday choices made by consumers come with little short-term consequences, however the emotional choices can lead to long-term meaningful consequences, and the greater the consequences of the decision the more emotional it become (Andrade, E.B. The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology, p. 91). For example, the experience of negative emotions can result in an increased consumptions of junk food (Andrade, E.B. The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology, p. 90), whereas the experience of positive emotions can lead to the consumption of healthier foods. These emotions become more intense and influential when important decision are being made.During the consumption of marketing material consumers will make evaluations of the content. These evaluations will either be feeling-based or reason-based evaluations. Feeling-based evaluations produce faster and more consistent judgements, and valence thoughts are more accurately predicted (Andrade, E.B. The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology, p. 90). Reason-based decisions occur when a person is faced with task of choosing, and they will seek and construct reasons for choice in an attempt to resolve conflict and justify their choice (Shafir, E. Simonson, I. Tversky, A. 1993). It is clear the mental process humans experience are key to influencing the physical actions we have.